Is Your Content Marketing Strategy Ready for Prime Time?

Otherwise, the tone-deaf sales professional that refuses to contextualize, refuses to personalize based on who a person is and where they are in their journey… They in many cases completely repulse prospects. And I don't use that word lightly, but when you're completely ignoring who they are, where they are, and what they care about, it's very jarring. And this is part of what gives sales professionals a bad name. Hey there. I'm Joshua Feinberg from SP Home Run. And I'm wondering, is your content strategy ready for prime time? Is your content strategy ready to go mainstream? So if you're struggling to create content, create copy, creating assets, educational resources, discreetly, or part of a more considered part of bringing people along in their journey from awareness to consideration to decision, it's really important to think about the context of how you're doing this. And for a mid-sized or enterprise content marketing team that's truly multidisciplinary, meaning that there's a dedicated strategist.

You have dedicated copywriters, have designers, developers, video producers, audio engineers, events managers. Notice all of these are plural, because in a mid-sized company or an enterprise company, you have the luxury on your content team potentially being Jeff Bezos talks about the two-pizza rule. Right? Well, you're going to need a lot of pizzas if you are scaling your content in a mid-market in an enterprise context. Your content strategy needs and how you navigate content will be completely different level of buyer insight needed to do this the right way relative to a smaller company that's just getting started, that maybe has one or two people on their entire marketing team, or that outsources their content marketing to a marketing agency with a relatively modest budget.

So first and foremost, think about big picture the size of your company and the resources that you have available. For the resource-constrained company that needs to get found by the right people in the right places at the right time. And most of all, in the right context, so that their team and their company are seen as the go-to experts. It is still essential to segment content based on buyer personas and buyer's journey or lifecycle stages. Although I would tend to lean more heavily into the labels. Talk about the significance of the awareness stage. What's going on there? The consideration stage where people are comparing their different options, and the decision stage where they're ready to make a purchase decision rather than just leaning into, like, top of the funnel, middle of the funnel, bottom of the funnel.

The bigger problem with all of this is that in smaller companies, building a modern sales team that can effectively and appropriately engage with leads that come in through your various content campaigns. For your sales team, this often requires a shift in their mindset for sales professionals to be positioned more as consultants or subject matter experts or advisors. Otherwise, the tone-deaf sales professional that refuses to contextualize, refuses to personalize based on who a person is and where they are in their journey, they in many cases, completely repulse prospects.

And I don't use that word lightly. But when you're completely ignoring who they are and where they are, what they care about, it's very, very jarring. And this is part of what gives sales professionals a bad name. You can put yourself into the top 5% top 1% by doing things as basic as understanding who a particular person is, their role, the persona, the ideal client profile that they fit into and where they are in their process and adjusting accordingly to where they are and meeting them where they are, not where you want them to be, but where they actually are.

Don't go pushing people into trying to elope on the first date. It's funny once in a while in a comedy movie, but is it really the kind of business relationships that your company wants to be going for? When you think about your content strategy, your content marketing strategy, really being ready to scale and making this work well for your internal stakeholders, making this work well for you. So your prospects and your customers have a great experience. Everything should really be planned around: First who this person is, who this reader? Who this listener, who this viewer, who this attendee is? the persona.

Second, is where this person is in their research process, their journey stage, a lifecycle stage? or whatever label gets the best internal buy-in organizational, buy-in from your team. And then, third, think about the conversion goal that you're going after that's relevant to who this person is and where this person is in their process. And again, that conversion goal should be contextually-relevant to who they are and what they're doing and their active research process. So again, we've been talking all about the content strategy, your content marketing strategy, and evaluating whether it's ready for prime time. What's your content strategy? How are you doing with all of this? Let me know in the comments below. I would love to hear your thoughts. And if you're looking for any one-on-one assistance with figuring this all out, feel free to reach out.

I'm Joshua Feinberg from SP Home Run. And we wish you great success in your content marketing strategy. Hey there..

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